Sun Princess Joins Ranks of Disabled Cruise Ships

USA TODAY and the Mirror newspaper in the U.K. report that Princess Cruises has canceled today's sailing of the Sun Princess, citing a power problem.

The Sun Princess is an 18 year-old cruise ship which just had a $30 million make-over. It was scheduled to sail a 14-night voyage from Singapore to Freemantle, Australia.

The power failure limited the cruise ship's ability to operate cabin lighting, air conditioning, vacuum toilet systems, and galley.

Sun Princess Cruise ShipPrincess Cruises said: "While Sun Princess was alongside at the Marina Bay Cruise Centre in Singapore, there was a malfunction to the ship’s switchboard resulting in limited onboard power hindering our ability to run all hotel operations."

"Regretfully, we've made the decision to cancel the cruise scheduled to depart today in order to carry out the necessary repairs."

The cruise ship will now resume service on September 3, 2013. 

The Sun Princess is the second vessel just this week that has been disabled by mechanical problems. Celebrity Cruises' Millennium is currently disabled in Ketchikan, Alaska due to propulsion issues. 

The problems come during a year when major lines like Carnival and Royal Caribbean experienced a rash of fires and mishaps which disabled their cruise ships. Many cruisers, particularly first time cruisers, are raising concerns regarding the safety of cruise ships.

The passengers will receive a full refund and a credit on a future cruise.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia / Lemeki Lenoa
 

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Comments (1) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Tim Koehler - August 27, 2013 5:15 PM

Don't need a survey. Just look at social media or the news or ask first time cruise customers. We are concerned that in an age when highly reliable systems are available, and when highly reliable maintenance procedures are available, that they don't seem to be applied successfully in the critical marine environment. Sooner or later there is going to be a disaster due to a series of critical failures. It is bad enought dealing with masters that do not follow instructions. Ships with one engine out of service often over several years. Stabaliser systems not working. Not just cruise ships. Australia is struggling to keep 1 serviceable submarine out of 6 in the water after spending billions. And in the west, everyone including parents and teachers tells little Johnny or Jill, oh Maths and Science are too difficult, why don't you do more social studies and humanities. It is harder and harder to get large teams of engineers that we need to think about design and maintenance systems.

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