According to the SEC, Royal Caribbean CEO Richard Fain (below right) sold 87,488 shares of his RCL stock at an average price of $76.41, for a total value of $6,684,958.08.

After the transaction, cruise executive Fain still owns 1,139,613 shares of his cruise line stock valued at approximately $87,077,829.33.

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Travel Weekly just published an "interview" of Royal Caribbean cruise executive Richard Fain as part of the cruise line’s promotional build-up to the arrival of the Quantum of the Seas. 

it’s hyperbolic, razzle-dazzle, gobbledygook at it’s finest.  

Royal Caribbean has been been invading crew gratuities for years, doubling up officers in what were previously

Richard Fain Adam GoldsteonReuters reports that Royal Caribbean’s CEO Richard Fain recently sold 94,850 shares at average price of $62.38 for a total value of $5,916,743.00; and exercised options for 51,143 shares at $7.27 per share for a total value of $3,190,300.00.

CEO Fain holds over a million shares of his cruise line’s stock.  Reuters says he holds

International soccer star David Beckham plans to build a soccer stadium at the Port of Miami with the dramatic vista of downtown Miami in the background. But the Chairman of Royal Caribbean Cruises is doing everything possible to block Beckham’s plans. 

In an interview with television station Local 10, cruise executive Richard Fain says that

This week I have read a couple of articles about the Cruise Lines International Association’s (CLIA) "Cruise 3 Sixty" conference in Fort Lauderdale. I read an article in the Sun Sentinel (Cruise Execs Talk About Industry’s Future) and an article in Travel Weekly (CEOs Say Cruise Lines Must Wow Travelers).

CLIA’s Christine Duffy

RCL Adam Goldstein The Daily Political reports that Royal Caribbean President Adam Goldstein (left) unloaded 2,181 shares of RCL cruise stock yesterday at an average price of $36.80, for a total value of $80,260.80.

Goldstein still owns 335,654 shares of the company’s stock worth over $12,350,000. 

A number of research firms have recently commented on RCL’s stock value. One

Cruise lines hate U.S. governmental scrutiny of their business operations.  

The whole purpose of incorporating their businesses and flagging their cruise ships in foreign countries is to avoid U.S. taxes and the scrutiny of federal regulators. This business model permits the cruise lines to pay virtually no U.S. taxes and to avoid U.S. wage, labor