The United States Coast Guard medevaced a 40 year-old female passenger from a Carnival cruise ship on Monday, January 21, 2019.

The Coast Guard medevaced a woman who was suffering from abdominal pains from the Carnival Pride when the cruise ship was around 50 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina yesterday.

The Coast Guard stations in Elizabeth City launched a helicopter which hoisted the ill passenger, her spouse, and a nurse and flew then to Carteret Health Care Medical Center in Morehead City.

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Video and photo credit: U.S. Coast Guard video by Air Station Elizabeth City via Defense Visual Information Distribution Service (DVIDS).

 

Carnival Pride MedevacsThe U.S. Coast Guard  medevaced two passengers on separate occasions from a Carnival cruise ship on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 according to a Coast Guard website.

The first medevac from the Carnival Pride ship involved a 46 year-old passenger who the shipboard medical team suspected had suffered a stroke on Monday night. Bad weather conditions apparently delayed the woman from being medevaced from the cruise ship until the following morning when the cruise ship was approximately from the cruise ship was 15 miles east of Charleston. The Coast Guard station in Charleston had received notification at around 6:27 p.m. Monday and launched a  MH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter from Savannah at 7 a.m. due to low visibility from heavy fog Monday night. The woman and a nurse were hoisted and taken to Roper St. Francis Hospital at 8:13 a.m.

Approximately four hours later, the Carnival ship contacted the Coast Guard and requested a second medevac involving a 64 year-old woman who was reportedly suffering from severe stomach pains. The Pride was 35 miles east of Savannahat this time.

The Carnival cruise ship contacted the Coast Guard station in Charleston for the need for a second passenger rescue at around 11:30 a.m. and the Coast Guard launched a MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Savannah around 11:45 a.m. The woman and a nurse were hoisted and taken to Memorial University Medical Center at around 1:49 p.m.

The Coast Guard noted that both woman are reportedly in stable condition.

Medevacs by the U.S. Coast Guard are paid for U.S. taxpayers; there are no expenses directly to the cruise line or cruise passenger or, in cases involving crew members, to the cruise ship employees if they require emergency evacuation from the ship.

Video credit: Defense Imagery Video Distribution System (DVIDS): Top and bottom – by Petty Officer 1st Class Luke Clayton U.S. Coast Guard District 7.

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Carnival Pride AllisionThe National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released its report yesterday regarding the allision* between the Carnival Pride and the pier and passenger walkway in Baltimore last year. 

On May 8, 2016, the Carnival Pride was attempting to dock at the cruise terminal in Baltimore, Maryland, when the ship’s bow struck the pier and an elevated passenger walkway on shore, causing over $2,000,000 in damages.

The Carnival cruise ship was returning from a cruise to the Bahamas. It had previously taken on a pilot while it was in U.S. inland waters. 

The staff captain later took the helm and was navigating the Pride to the terminal. As the ship approached the pier, the angle of approach was too steep and the speed was too fast.

The captain took control of the ship from the staff captain and applied full thrust away from the berth to slow the ship but not before the bow struck the pier support columns.

The NTSB concluded that the probable cause of the crash was the staff captain’s errors during the docking maneuver (approaching the pier with excessive speed and at too steep of an angle) and the captain’s insufficient oversight. 

You can see photos of the extensive damage here.  

Read the full report here

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Photos credit: Top – CBS Baltimore; bottom – NTSB report via gCaptain.

* Definition of "allision:" the action of dashing against or striking upon; example – by a vessel against an object ashore, in contrast to a "collision" between two vessels.  

Carnival Pride Allision Baltimore

 The U.S. Coast Guard medevaced a passenger from a Carnival cruise ship yesterday.

The Coast Guard medevaced a 72-year-old woman Saturday from the Carnival Pride which was approximately 50 miles east of Savannah, Georgia.

The Carnival ship notified the Coast Guard station in Charleston around noon that the woman was experiencing pneumonia but was not reacting to medical treatment. A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Savannah medevaced the woman an hour and one-half later and transported her to Savannah Memorial Hospital shortly after 2:30 p.m.

Video credit: Defense Video Imagery Distribution System.

 

 

The U.S. Coast Guard medevaced an 80-year-old passenger from a Carnival cruise ship yesterday, according to a news station in North Carolina

Yesterday afternoon, a Coast guard station in North Carolina received an emergency call from the Carnival Pride that a woman on the cruise ship was having health complications.

The Coast Guard sent a helicopter crew to the cruise ship and hoisted her aboard around 3:15 p.m. The helicopter flew her to Carteret General Urgent Care in Morehead City. 

Video Credit WITN

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Carnival Pride Fire Several people on the Carnival Pride tell me that a fire occurred in the engine room of engine no. 1 last night.

One passenger described the fire as involving an explosion of the engine.

The fire was extinguished and the Pride was delayed arriving at the next port (Half Moon Cay) today.

One passenger sent photographs of a crew member / fireman in a 4th deck hallway getting dresssed for the fire and passengers on deck wearing lifevests.

10 days ago, a fire broke out on the Carnival Liberty when the cruise ship was in St. Thomas USVI.

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Carnival released the following statement: 

MIAMI — At approximately 1.15am this morning, the Carnival Pride experienced a mechanical failure of one of its diesel generators which triggered the automated fire suppression system. It is unclear as to whether there was an actual fire and the matter is presently under investigation. At no time did the ship lose power and the vessel is currently continuing on its itinerary which involves a seven-day cruise from Baltimore that departed Sunday. The ship is currently in Half Moon Cay in the Bahamas for its regularly scheduled port visit there. There were no injuries to guests or crew and all safety, hotel and other operational systems are fully functional.

Carnival subsequently added the followng statement:

"CCTV footage has confirmed that there was not an actual fire, only smoke."

The United States Coast Guard is reporting that it last night it medevaced a 77 year old female cruise ship passenger suffering from a stroke approximately 200 miles east of Wilmington, North Carolina.

The ill woman was on the Carnival Pride. 

The Coast Guard air crew arrived on the scene at at sea on scene and hoisted the passenger, a family member and a nurse from the cruise ship into a MH-60 helicopter at about 7:30 p.m. 

The helicopter flew the woman to the Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, North Carolina, arriving at about 9 p.m.  

A Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules aircraft crew, dispatched from Elizabeth City. North Carolina, assisted in the medevac.

Video Credit: Defense Imagery and Information Systems   

The U.S. Coast Guard medevaced a sick cruise passenger from a Carnival cruise ship today approximately 70 miles south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

The Carnival Pride request a medevac for an ill 47-year-old passenger. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Elizabeth City, North Carolina arrived at approximately 4:40 p.m.

The helicopter hoisted the passenger and few him to Carteret General Hospital in Morehead City, North Carolina.   

Video Credit: Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System  by PO3 David Weydert

Fire on Carnival PrideThey say that a picture is worth a thousand words.

Well today I agree with that expression after watching a nine minute video that a former crew member sent me.

Earlier today I posted two videos showing the Carnival Pride experiencing rough weather back on November 5, 2011. High waves crash over the bow which resulted in a window being blown in and a children’s play area (Circle C) being flooded. Water enters the area at high speed covering all of the walls and ceiling and dousing the televisions and electrical equipment.

The video below is a continuation of those videos. It shows the kid’s area flooded. One of the televisions on the wall begins to short circuit. There are about 5 minutes of the television sparking, smoldering and emitting black smoke until a fire erupts.

A crew member eventually shows up two and one-half minutes later. He kneels down and tries to splash water onto the burning Carnival Pride Cruise Ship Firetelevision. Bad idea. It also looks like he tries to pull the television off of the wall.

A couple of crew members then quickly enter the area and put the fire out with fire extinguishers.

I never could have imagined that just a few minutes after Circle C was flooded, a fire would break out there from a television. I would not have believed it unless I saw the video.

The Carnival Pride was heading to port in Baltimore when it encountered the rough weather.

A reader left a comment to our first article and pointed out that Cruise Critic contains some passing comments about the flooding and the fire.

It’s unusual to see photographs or videos of floods or fires on cruise ships.  Cruise lines don’t release images from their surveillance cameras to the public.  Thanks to the former crew who sent us these images.

 

 

//www.youtube.com/embed/K-EmD7YKD4k?rel=0

Today a jury here in Miami returned a significant award against a major shipping company, Maersk Lines.

The case involved William Skye, a 57 year old Jones Act seaman (crewmember) from New Jersey, who worked for Maersk Lines Limited as a Chief Mate (the crewmember rank just under Master / Captain) aboard a Maersk container vessel called the Sealand Pride.

Mr. Skye was represented by Jason Margulies and Michael Winkleman, of the law firm Lipcon, Margulies, Alsina and Winkleman, who I interviewed for this article.

According to Mr. Margulies, “this case is, to our knowledge, a case of first impression that has never before been brought.”

Maersk Sealand Pride Container Ship LawsuitMr. Skye alleged that he was assigned and required to perform so many duties in connection with his job as a Chief Mate for Maersk that, over a 4 year period of time, he was required to violate the work/rest hour laws that comprise the STCW (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping).

The STCW provides, in part, in 46 USC 8104(d), that “A licensed individual or seaman in the deck or engine department may not be required to work more than 8 hours in one day.”; and in 46 CFR 15.1111 (a) “Each person assigned duty as officer in charge of a navigational or engineering watch, or duty as a rating forming part of a navigational or engineering watch, on board any vessel that operates beyond the Boundary Line shall receive a minimum of 10 hours of rest in any 24-hour period.”

While there are some exceptions to the foregoing, the rest received may not be less than 70 hours in any 7 day period. Further, he must receive at least a 6 hour uninterrupted rest period daily.

As part of his required job duties, Mr. Skye alleged that he was required to stand two 4 hour watches a day, and then perform additional tasks of his approximately 28 additional job duties associated with his position as Chief Mate. On average, the Plaintiff alleges that he was required to work approximately 15.75 hours a day; violating both 46 USC 8104(d) and 46 CFR 15.1111.

As a result of his long working hours and inability to receive enough uninterrupted rest, Ms. Skye alleged that he was diagnosed with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy by his cardiologist, Dr. Joseph Wachspress, in June 2008.  This condition is a physical thickening of the left ventricular portion of the heart, making it difficult for the heart to pump blood and significantly increasing chances of a heart attack. Further, he Maersk - William Skye - Lawsuitwas diagnosed with an adjustment disorder by his psychiatrist, Dr. Arnold Goldman, in 2008. Both his cardiologist and psychiatrist related his injuries to his working conditions aboard the Sealand Pride and recommended that he retire early, at age 54, from working aboard ships. During his last year of work, he earned approximately $171,000 and received approximately $36,000 in fringe benefits (food, shelter, medical care, etc.)

Mr. Skye was also a licensed attorney. He went to law school in the 1980’s and practiced for a short period of time thereafter, deciding to return to a life at sea thereafter. Although his doctors do not restrict his ability to earn a living as a lawyer,  because he has not practiced law since the 80’s, he is currently finding it very difficult to earn any significant amount in his practice as a lawyer. Nevertheless, Plaintiff’s vocational rehabilitation expert, Dr. Robert Lessne, testified that if he were able to find a job with a law firm as a lawyer, he could expect to earn approximately $69,000 based on his current level of expertise. Dr. Lessne further testified that William Skye’s working life expectancy, from the point that he retired in 2008 was approximately 17 more years.

During trial, Plaintiff presented the testimony of two former Maersk employees, Michael McCright and Steven Krupa. Michael McCright was a former relief Chief Mate aboard Maersk ships and he testified as to the difficult job that chief mates working for Maersk faced and that it was impossible to do the job without working a significant amount of overtime, which was exhausting. Steven Krupa was a former fleet manager for Maersk and testified that ultimately Maersk was responsible for complying with the STCW laws but that Maersk did not affirmatively do anything to check that its crew members were able to complete their job duties and comply with the STCW work/rest hours.  Mr. Skye also presented the testimony of one of the Maersk captains under which he worked, Cpt. James Brennan, who testified that William Skye was a good and competent Chief Mate who would complain to him that complying with the STCW work/rest hours was difficult.

Maersk - Sealand PrideFurther, Mr. Skye introduced evidence that showed that Maersk actually budgeted 185% of the Chief Mate’s base salary to overtime; far more than the overtime budget for any other position on the ship (by comparison Maersk’s overtime budget for the Captain was 26% of his base salary).

Maersk was represented by defense attorneys, David Horr and Stephanie Wylie, who are two of the best lawyers defending shipping companies and cruise lines in Miami.They presented arguments that it was primarily Mr. Skye’s responsibility as Chief Mate to make sure that the work/rest hours were complied with. Further, they argued that Mr. Skye failed to delegate tasks which would have made it feasible for him to comply with the work/rest hours and allowed him to obtain uninterrupted rest.

Additionally, Maersk argued that Mr. Skye’s injury was caused by cardiac conditions which he began complaining of in 2000 and, as such, his filing of a lawsuit in May 2011 violated the applicable three year statute of limitations. Maersk also presented testimony from cardiologist, Dr. Theodore Feldman, who testified that the left ventricular hypertrophy did not preclude him from working aboard ships and was easily controlled with medication.  Maersk also presented testimony from maritime safety expert, Captain Douglas Torborg, who went through three and a half years of duty logs (work hour logs) regarding Mr. Skye and testified that, based on the exceptions to the work/rest hours of the STCW, the working hours did not constitute a violation of the laws.  Douglas Torborg admitted that he has billed Maersk’s lawyers approximately $60,000 for his work in reaching those opinions. Lastly, Maersk argued that Mr. Skye had long planned to retire in 2008 before finding out about his hear condition.

In the end, the jury did not find that there was statutory violations of the STCW laws. They did, however, find that Maersk was negligent and that its negligence was a legal cause of Mr. Skye’s injuries.  As a result of such injuries, which were first able to be discovered by Mr. Skye in 2008, he was forced to retire 10 years early. They awarded $2,088,549.00 (present value) for those 10 years of lost wages.  The jury also found that Mr. Skye’s non-economic damages totaled $273,750.00. They found Maersk 25% negligent and William Skye 75% comparatively negligent.

I asked Mr. Horr if he has a comment and we will  update this story if we receive additional comments from the defense side.

 

Photo credit:

Top: Ship Spotting  / © Magogman

Bottom: Global Security