Royal Seas Cruises Refuses Refund After Customer's Wife Dies

A man from Tennessee was "stunned" when a company calling itself "Royal Seas Cruises" initially refused to refund his cruise to the Bahamas after his wife unexpectedly died. 

A news station in Knoxville reports that Bob Mackay and his wife Bonnie had paid for a cruise but his wife died shortly before they could go on the trip. 

As WATE explains, Bob was devasted when Bonnie died on June 26th. He called Royal Seas a few days after the funeral, asking for a refund of their cruise.  

“They told me that they would not cancel it. That I could sell it. Or if I found another girlfriend, I could use it and take her,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it when I heard it. I really don’t want to go on a cruise without my wife . . . ”

Bob requested to speak to the service representative’s supervisor who reportedly "had no interest in giving me a refund whatsoever,” notwithstanding Royal Seas' claim that its "customer service is second to none."

But after an "on your side" reporter contacted Royal Seas, the cruise line quickly agreed to issue a full refund.

Free Cruise Scam?

Royal Sea Cruises is actually not a cruise line but a vacation marketing company which sells cruises on the Grand Celebration which many passengers have complained is part of a "free cruise" scam.

The Better Business Bureau rates Royal Seas Cruise a "D-." It writes that its files contain "a pattern of complaints from consumers that allege they were contacted by Royal Seas Cruises informing them they won a 'free' cruise; however when they tried to redeem the free cruise they were informed of undisclosed fees and the requirement of attending a time share presentation. Consumers informed BBB they cancelled the cruise and requested a refund but they did not receive a refund from Royal Seas Cruises. Some consumers allege receiving unwanted phone calls from Royal Seas Cruises and requested to be removed from the company's call list but they still continue to receive calls." 

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(305) 749-5493 "Free Cruise" Text Scam?

Free Cruise? Local news ABC-7 Fort Meyers is reporting that "scammers" are sending out text messages claiming that you have won a "free cruise."

Of course, there is no such thing as a truly free cruise but it seems like some people forget that.

The news station explains that "the scammers text you and tell you you’ve won a cruise. But when you call the number, a customer service representative says all you have to do is pay the $60 port fees. They suggest for you to put it on your credit or debit card – just give them the number."

"Don't do it," says Sgt. Dana Coston with the Cape Coral Police Department.  The news station calls them "crooks" looking for "free money" from victims.

The telephone number involved, according to the news station, is (305) 749-5493.

Give them a call and listen to the sales pitch. Just don't get talked into giving them your credit card number! 

Cruise Critic published an article several years ago about the "free cruise" offer: The Free Cruise Offer: Scam or Legit?

Photo Credit: Cruise Critic

 

 

Caribbean Cruise Line Lies and Steals?

A television station in Louisville, Kentucky reported on an interesting story today entitled "Woman Claims Cruise Company Promising Free Cruise Lied, Stole."

Amy Zetina, a hard working mother of three in Kentucky, responded to an ad which offered a "free cruise."

Ms. Zetina was taken for a ride, but it wasn't on a cruise ship. 

It turns out that "Caribbean Cruise Line" offers “free” Caribbean cruise package, with some ads featuring Carmen Electra promoting a "free" cruise.

Ms. Zetina received a packet in the mail telling her that she was the lucky winner of a "free" cruise, including a $1,300 voucher.  She agreed to pay only for port taxes and then gave her credit card number over the telephone.  The cruise company then began sucking money out of her account.

Ms. Zetina did not know that 458 customers had lodged complaints against Caribbean Cruise Line.  Nor did she know about it's "F" rating with the Better Business Bureau.  An investigation by the television station revealed that the company made unauthorized charges against customers' credit cards. 

After Ms. Zetina contacted the television station, she called the Better Business Bureau, the Attorney General's office and the local police.  Only then did she get her money back.

You can find complaints about this company on the Complaints Board and Ripoff Report and throughout the internet. 

Moral of the story?  There are no free cruises in life.  And when someone rips you off, fight back.

Enjoy the official ad of Caribbean Cruise Line with Carmen Electra (in Spanish - Cruceros Gratis!

 

 

PS:  There have been criticism of marketing scams by "Caribbean Cruise Line" which is not a cruise line at all but a marketing company which also sells time shares in the Bahamas.  We last mentioned this company two weeks ago in a story about an affiliated company, Celebration Cruise Line -  Report of Rape on Bahamas Celebration Cruise Ship.    

April 26, 2012 Update: The fun & games continue.  A "free cruise?"  I don't think so.  Hanging Up On A Free Cruise: The Emotional Toll Of Doing The Right Thing

 

Photo Credit:  Celebration Cruise Line website