Carnival Executives Switch Roles

Carnival Cruise LineSeveral news sources are reporting changes in the executive ranks at Carnival Corporation and its brands, Princess Cruises and Holland America Line. 

Carnival Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer (COO) Howard Frank will step down. He is slated to be an adviser to CEO Arnold Donald and Chairman Micky Arison. Jan Swartz becomes the new president of Princess Cruises, replacing President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Alan Buckelew who moves into the COO role at Carnival. Holland America Line CEO Stein Kruse will begin overseeing Princess Princess under the newly formed entity "Holland America Group." 

It seems like a family affair to me.  Everyone is just changing hats.

The changes become effective December 1, 2013.

I'm pleased to see Ms. Swartz promoted from vice president of sales, marketing and customer service at Princess to the position of president. It's nice to see women advance in the men's club.  

Carnival Cruise Compensation: The Rich Get Richer

Travel Weekly and Skift recently reported that the new CEO of Carnival Corporation, Arnold Donald, will receive the following in compensation:

Arnold Donald - Carnival Cruise Lines Compensation$1 million base salary to start, with reviews by the board of directors to increase or decrease his salary;

A fixed bonus of $1.125 million for 2013;

A one-time award of performance-based restricted stock with a target value of $3 million, although it could be 5 times that depending on company’s performance;

An annual stock award with a fair market value of $3.5 million in long term incentives;

$350,000 to cover relocation and temporary living expenses; and

A bonus for 2014 up to $2.65 million which could go up to $5.3 million in 2015.

You can read the official SEC filing here.

Mr. Donald must be so happy that he feels like dancing. 

The only things missing are a half dozen front row seats to the Miami Heat games.

This news must feel like salt into the wounds of the long term Carnival Cruise Lines crew members who lost their retirement benefits earlier this week. 

 

Photo Image: St. Louis Post Dispatch

Carnival Cruise CEO Arison Pockets $90,000,000

Miami's Daily Business Review reports today that Micky Arison paid himself a "special year-end dividend" of $90,000,000. Yes, that's 90 million dollars.

Cruise CEO Arison is not the only executive in Florida lining his pockets, as the Review states that other executives in Florida are paying themselves dividends in the range of $250,000 to around $20,000,000. The newspaper states that the whopper of a dividend was probably paid due to expectations that federal tax rates will jump next year. I suppose that's called the "Romney-didn't-win-dividend."

Arison is already by far the richest person in Florida with a net worth of many billions of dollars. The last time I checked it was over $4,000,000,000, or maybe it was $7,000,000,000. I forget. What's an extra billion or two?

Costa Concordia - Micky ArisonI was thinking of entitling this blog "Micky Arison is a fat greedy pig" but at least one journalist already called him that over a decade ago. So I'll keep what I'm thinking to myself.

But, I have to add that it must be something to be the CEO of a foreign corporation that pays no U.S. federal taxes and owns a $600,000,000 cruise ship which sank (the Concordia operated by subsidiary Costa) and killed 32 people and at the end of the year you pay yourself an additional $90,000,000. Yes, the disaster caused some lost revenue for Carnival for a few months. But by the end of the year, Carnival profits are higher than ever. 32 dead customers and crew are not a problem if you keep them from filing suit in the U.S. 

While Arison pays himself a dividend of $90,000,000, he offered the families of the dead and traumatized Concordia passengers $15,000 each. 

When I think of Arison paying himself an extra $90,000.000, I also think of the 150 waiters from India who worked for P&O Cruises (another Carnival subsidiary) who were fired earlier this year at the instructions of Carnival's executives after they went on strike for about an hour in Seattle over low pay and the non-payment of tips. There are now 150 families struggling in India because Carnival made an example of them to show what happens if crew members in Carnival's fleet of 100 cruise ships complain about low pay.

Earlier this week, Arison's cruise line ignited controversy by issuing a last minute edict that passengers who bought tickets on Carnival's drag queen cruise would not be permitted to dress in drag in order to avoid offending "family values." When a boycott was threatened that might result in Carnival losing millions from the offended LGBT community, Carnival reconsidered and lifted the ban on dressing drag.

Always following the money, Arison obviously thought that paying himself a $90,000,000 dividend was not a drag either.   

I wonder what Arison will do with the extra $90,000,000?  Raise wages for his loyal employees on his cruise ships? Invest in a health clinic in India for Carnival crew? Donate the money to a charity for sick seafarers?  Ha. That's something Bill Gates or Warren Buffett would do.  

Read some of our other articles about CEO Arison and judge for yourself. 

Cruise Line Fat Cat Billionaires    

Breaking News: Carnival Cruise Lines Incorporates in the U.S. and Subjects Itself to U.S. Labor, Wage, Safety and Environmental Regulations

Is Carnival's Mickey Arison a Greedy Corporate Pig?

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Royal Caribbean Executives Get Richer While Crew Members Get Poorer

In a proxy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Royal Caribbean Cruises disclosed that its 2010 compensation paid to CEO Richard Fain (photo left) increased almost 60% to $8,600,000.  Royal Caribbean increased the compensation paid to the company's four other named executives from 18.5% to almost 50%.  The largest compensation increase of the four executives  went to Adam Goldstein (photo right), the president of Royal Caribbean International, whose total compensation increased to over $4,000,000. 

These increases were primarily incentive based, meaning that the executives met or exceeded Royal Caribbean Executives - Richard Fain - Adam Goldsteincertain financial goals for the corporation.

One of the company's goal we have been concerned with has been to reduce payments to ill and injured crew members.  In 2008, Royal Caribbean had over over 1,200 open medical files for ill and injured crew members around the world.  Due to certain cost cutting measures, by 2010 Royal Caribbean slashed the number of open crew medical files to around 400. 

In the process, the cruise line culled over 800 ill crew members from its medical department's responsibility.  In many instances, there was no legal basis to terminate the medical care.  In cases where the medical care was not arbitrarily terminated, the cruise line reduced the daily stipend for sick crew employees from $25 to $12 a day.  Needless to say, it is impossible for anyone to live on $12 for food and lodging a day.

These harsh cost cutting measures "saved" Royal Caribbean millions.  Given the fact that cruise executives Fain and Goldstein collected over $12,500,000 together last year, it looks like the money formerly spent on crew member medical benefits ended up in the executives' pockets.   

 

Photo credit:  Royal Caribbean International Flickr photostream